What is the purpose of a cancer registry?

What is the purpose of a cancer registry How is it important?

A cancer registry is essential for collecting, compiling, and analyzing cancer data throughout the state. Cancer registries across the country collect data on nearly 1.6 million cancer cases each year, including information on location, how cancer spreads, and how cancer is treated.

What is the role of the cancer registrar?

Cancer registrars are data information specialists who collect and report cancer statistics. Cancer registrars capture a complete history, diagnosis, treatment, and health status for every cancer patient in the U.S.

What information is maintained in the cancer registry?

Cancer registries maintain a wide range of demographic and medical information: Demographic information: age, gender, race/ethnicity, birthplace, and residence. Medical history: physical findings, screening information, occupation, and any history of a previous cancer.

How are cancer registries used?

Because cancer registry data provide a census of cancer cases, registry data can be used to: 1) define and monitor cancer incidence at the local, state, and national levels; 2) investigate patterns of cancer treatment; and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts to prevent cancer cases and improve cancer …

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Why is it important to know about cancer?

Physicians need cancer data to learn more about the causes of cancer and detect cancer earlier, thereby increasing the chance of finding a cure. Cancer specialists make treatment choices based on accurate cancer data from such sources as reports from pathologists and cytologists.

Do all states have a cancer registry?

Before the NPCR was established, 10 states had no registry, and most states with registries lacked the resources and legislative support they needed to gather complete data. Today, the NPCR supports central cancer registries in 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Pacific Island Jurisdictions.

Do cancer registrars work from home?

Working remotely is a growing trend for cancer registrars. Some hospitals promote this option, but others do not. Many require a few years of experience in the hospital before allowing remote working from home. Some registrars work for outsourcing companies hired by hospitals to staff their cancer registry.

What degree do you need to be a cancer registrar?

Earn an Associate Degree or complete 60-Hours of College-Level Courses, including Six College Credit Hours in Human Anatomy and Human Physiology. Complete one year (1,950 hours) of Cancer Registry Experience. Pass the Certified Tumor Registrar (CTR) Exam. Maintain the CTR Credential with Continuing Education Courses.

How often is data reported to the cancer registry?

Once a year, state central cancer registries send information on cancers diagnosed in the state to CDC. The cancer information is reviewed and added to the United States Cancer Statistics database.

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Who usually collects and maintains cancer registry data?

Cancer registrars—also known as tumor registrars—are highly trained data management experts who collect and process cancer data.

What is population cancer registry?

Population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) aim to identify all cases of cancer that occur in a defined population. A defined set of variables is recorded for each case; the minimum number is 10, but most registries have a more extensive dataset.