How long after chemo Can I have a massage?

Can cancer patients get a massage?

Does massage help, cancer patients? Yes, medical studies conducted have shown evidence that massages can help cancer patients both after and during treatment. Massage therapy can help cancer patients counteract both emotional and physical side effects that traditional treatment options can impose on your body.

Is massage good after chemotherapy?

Deep massage, or any type of massage that involves strong pressure, should NOT be used if you are undergoing chemotherapy and radiation. People undergoing chemotherapy may have a decrease in red and white blood cells, so with deep massage, there is a risk of bruising.

Why is massage not recommended for cancer?

Massage concerns for people with cancer

Chemotherapy – This drug treatment affects the whole body. If you have a chemotherapy port, massage should not be done in this area. Some people who have chemotherapy experience tingling in their hands or feet (peripheral neuropathy), and may find they bruise or bleed easily.

Can you have massage during chemotherapy?

People undergoing chemotherapy may have a decrease in red and white blood cells which can make the body more susceptible to bruising. Therefore, light massage is recommended for people currently in treatment.

What is oncology massage?

“Oncology massage is a form of non-invasive, compassionate touch,” says Thurman. “Even though doctors and nurses are doing an amazing job helping them get better, patients are used to their caretakers causing pain during tests, treatments and surgery. Massage therapy is a form of touch that causes no pain.”

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Can you go to a spa when having chemo?

However, if you are undergoing cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it can cause your immune system to be compromised, which means that pools, saunas and steam rooms may not be advised whilst having active treatment.

Is lymphatic massage good for cancer patients?

Massage is not only non-harmful to lymphoma patients, it’s actually beneficial for most cancer patients and can be an important part of a patient’s palliative care – a specialized form of medicine focused on treating the whole patient – at any point of treatment – during a serious illness and includes symptom and pain …